PIA21030: Closing in on Jupiter's North Pole


Closing in on Jupiter’s North Pole

Caption:

As NASA's Juno spacecraft closed in on Jupiter for its Aug. 27, 2016 pass, its view grew sharper and fine details in the north polar region became increasingly visible.

The JunoCam instrument obtained this view on August 27, about two hours before closest approach, when the spacecraft was 120,000 miles (195,000 kilometers) away from the giant planet (i.e., for Jupiter's center).

Unlike the equatorial region's familiar structure of belts and zones, the poles are mottled with rotating storms of various sizes, similar to giant versions of terrestrial hurricanes. Jupiter's poles have not been seen from this perspective since the Pioneer 11 spacecraft flew by the planet in 1974.

Background Info:

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, manages the Juno mission for the principal investigator, Scott Bolton, of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. The Juno mission is part of the New Frontiers Program managed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, built the spacecraft. JPL is a division of Caltech in Pasadena.

More information about Juno is online at http://www.nasa.gov/juno and http://missionjuno.swri.edu .

Cataloging Keywords:

Name Value Additional Values
Target Jupiter Earth
System Jupiter Earth
Target Type Planet Earth
Mission Juno Pioneer
Instrument Host Juno Pioneer 11
Host Type Flyby Spacecraft Orbiter
Instrument JunoCam
Detector
Extra Keywords Atmosphere, Color, Storm, Visual
Acquisition Date
Release Date 2016-09-02
Date in Caption 2016-08-27
Image Credit NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
Source photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21030
Identifier PIA21030